Lefthanders Playing Other Positions

There are no statistics on how many lefthanders play or have played in the National Football League, and no apparent reason (other than curiosity) why it should matter.

When receivers catch a football, they usually use two hands, so which hand is their stronger hand should not matter.

When running backs take a hand-off from the quarterback, they also use two hands, so again it should not matter if they are lefthanded or righthanded.

When blockers block, or when defensive players tackle, they generally use both hands and both sides of their body, so which hand is stronger should not matter.

The only position on the football field (besides quarterback) where hand preference might make a difference is at center, where a quarterback might find it awkward to take the hike from a lefthander. Most quarterbacks would be able to adjust to a lefthanded center if given time to do so, but sometime the coach might lose patience after the first few missed connections, and be more likely to replace the center than replace the quarterback.

Lefthanded Football - Other Positions 

LEFTHANDERS IN SPORTS

The Success and The Failures of Lefthanders In Sports